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Author Topic: Hello everyone!  (Read 3573 times)
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Heather
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« on: August 31, 2014, 5:35 PM »

I've been lurking here for quite some time ... because I know Pat (she's kinda related to me hehe) ... Cheesy

I have recently started looking at DSLR camera's and I have my eye on a Nikon D90 body.  I am wanting to know what kind of lenses I should be looking for, just to get started with using this camera, and become familiar with it.  I can work on getting further lenses in the future, but for now I am just wanting something that is relatively easy to use and will work well with the camera I have my eye on. 

I am all ears, and willing to learn all I can from those who know more than I do about photography (and I don't know a lot), so that's why I am here ... Cheesy

Looking forward to getting to know all of you!

Heather
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BigAl
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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2014, 6:10 PM »

For best results a good lens is far more important than a good camera body - so don't skimp on quality here.

Your first lens will probably be a zoom lens that covers a reasonable range of situations. For me, that is the AF-S Nikkor 24-120mm 1:3.5-5.6 G. With its vibration reduction it helps me cope with most situations. That will give you loads of images before you begin to think about adding a telephoto or wide-angle to your kit.
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Harry7mc
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« Reply #2 on: September 1, 2014, 3:20 AM »

As Al say's the lens is the most important factor. A bad lens on a top class body wont give top shots
However as a D90 user I add my 3penorth--- The 18/55mm Standard zoom Nikor is capable of good results( If money is a factor when starting out).
 The 18/105 mm zoom Nikor is a very reasonably priced walk about lens giving fine results ( One of my Lenses now used on a converted D70).
 Now if money is not a problem to your budget Then Go for 16/85mm Zoom Nikor( equates to 24/120mm on a full frame Nikon) as the D90 Is crop sensor camera. Results are top class..
HarryH
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Chocky
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« Reply #3 on: September 1, 2014, 7:08 AM »

I have a Nikon Camera and use mainly  Nikon lenses. I have Tamron and Sigma but find the Nikon lenses far superior................. also in price but worth it
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Pat
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« Reply #4 on: September 1, 2014, 12:50 PM »

Heather, make sure you also see this topic:

http://www.photography-cafe.com/forum/index.php?topic=19515.0

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pekster
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« Reply #5 on: September 1, 2014, 2:01 PM »

Hi Heather, welcome to the cafe first of all Thumb Up I have really enjoyed seeing some of your N.Ireland photos from your recent trip on FB.

I think most of the starter lenses have been covered in the previous comments, I too can vouch for the 18-105 lens as Wendy uses it on her camera and has very good results from it. Another to consider, although it is an older lens is the previous kit lens. The 18-70 Nikkor, which can be picked up relatively cheap as it is not made anymore. One thing to remember is it does not have VR stabilisation though.
  As Chocky has mentioned Tamron or Sigma are a good option too. I have several Sigma and a couple of Tamron lenses.

Whichever you choose I wish you luck and look forward to seeing more of your work as you progress with your photography.

Richard
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Heather
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« Reply #6 on: September 1, 2014, 4:09 PM »

Thank you everyone for your input and suggestions!  I certainly have a lot to think about.  I will be taking my time with this, but I will take every suggestion into consideration when I make my choice.  Pekster, I think you have me confused with my cousin who recently visited N. Ireland, because although I would really love to travel I have not been able to do so yet ... Cheesy  Will continue to read and watch for suggestions!
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« Reply #7 on: September 2, 2014, 4:34 PM »

Pretty much any modern Nikon lens, as well as some third-party lenses with Nikon EF mounts, will work with your camera, as well as some not-so-modern Nikon lenses.  What you want/need besides your kit lens will depend a lot on what kinds of pictures you want to take and under what conditions you take them.  Not sure if the D90 body has its own focus motor - I think it does - but if it doesn't, the lenses will still fit but the lenses without their own focus motors must be focused manually.  You can use the images you have taken with your existing equipment as a guide, especially if your existing camera is digital.  If so, and if the camera is reasonably modern, each image taken with it should have an EXIF header that gives a lot of information about the camera's settings at the time the image was captured.  You can access this heading from most modern image editors by looking for the Image -> Info in your browser's menu.  The lens focal length may need to be converted to 35 mm film or full-frame digital equivalent, then multiplied by 1.5 to convert to the focal length needed to get the same field of view on your soon-to-be-acquired D90 (or other camera body with a DX imager).  This conversion factor depends on your previous camera's model, or more precisely, the dimensions of the active part of the imager.  As a start, a zoom lens with a focal length range of 24-70 mm will give results about like the 35-105 mm equivalent lenses that many point-and-shoot cameras with 3:1 zooms are equipped with.  The 24-120 mm lens will give considerably more telephoto capability than this, equivalent to about 36-180 mm on a full-frame or 35 mm film camera.

When I got my first dSLR, I already knew that my shots tended to be biased toward the telephoto end and that I also would be shooting a lot in dim ambient light, so I skipped the kit lens altogether in favor of a used Tamron 28-75 mm f/2.8 lens.  However, when I got my camera, I would be going to Yosemite soon thereafter and my funds were modest.  Going to Yosemite without a proper wide-angle lens is a major crime against photography, so I also picked up an inexpensive Tokina 17 mm f/3.5.  It turned out that, once I had true wide-angle capability, I used it more than I thought I would so I eventually picked up a Tamron 17-50 mm f/2.8 lens, with a field of view equivalent to 28-75 mm or so on a full-frame camera.  For a while, my camera was wearing one or the other of the Tamrons most of the time despite the fact that I had collected some other lenses in the meantime.  I am still using the Tamron 28-75 mm but the Tamron 17-50 mm lens broke and I eventually replaced it with a Sigma 18-35 mm f/1.8, one of the very few zoom lenses that would fit my dSLR model (or yours) that has an aperture that opens up that wide.  You may not need something like that for general landscape photography, but as I have already mentioned, I shoot in dim light a lot and needed that wide aperture.
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Heather
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« Reply #8 on: September 2, 2014, 5:13 PM »

I thought of something this morning as I was going to sleep (I work nights and then go to school during the day), it kept me up until I investigated! ... I have a really old camera of my Dad's - the one he used before getting his F50 in 1996 ... I tried the basic lens he had on that one and it fits, so I can get used to some of the settings (it's an E series lens, but at least I can take pictures)

The basic lens information can be found here: http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/28f28ais.htm

I also have an Auto Makinon mc zoom 1:4.5, it's a manual focus macro/zoom lens ... 

So it looks like I have a couple of lenses that I can use to get used to the settings on my new camera.

I know very little about using dSLR cameras, I have even very rarely used SLR cameras ... I've mostly used point and shoot cameras, so this is going to be a real learning experience ... Cheesy
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